I Love The Song…But…

Zach Williams has a great voice!

I love his song, “Fear Is a Liar.”

If you are not familiar with it, here it is:

What’s my “but” about?

I wish he’d written, “Satan is a liar.” (perhaps one of the reasons he did not is because there exists a song by that name, though not hugely popular)

Since Williams personifies “fear,” it’s easy to suppose he meant Satan…

But…

“Fear” is not a bad thing…particularly “fear of the Lord” which is, of course, “…the beginning of wisdom…”

Please know, I am not hammering Zach…I want to see him in concert!

Just expressing a preference.

What do you think?

 

 

David’s Good Advice

I know I’ve read the passage before, but during my “regular” reading yesterday the following counsel David gave Solomon resonated in an unusual fashion:

“And Solomon, my son, learn to know the God of your ancestors intimately. Worship and serve Him with your whole heart and a willing mind. For the Lord sees every heart and knows every plan and thought. If you seek Him, you will find Him. But if you forsake Him, He will reject you forever. So take this seriously. The LORD has chosen you to build a Temple as His sanctuary. Be strong, and do the work.” 1 Chron 28.9,10 (NLT)

The “bolded” words slapped me the hardest. Encouraging, exhorting, and incentive to “keep on” even if a bit tired, a bit disappointed, a bit stressed.

It was, and is, a help to me as I meditate, memorize, and, now, share it.

 

 

Not for the Jews Only

There is a school of thought, theologically, that repentance was for the Jews only. The Charles Ryrie Study Bible, for instance, pushes this.

The “logic” behind this belief is that repentance is a work and thus adds to the gospel message. However the Word says “the goodness of God leads you to repentance…”

And as far as repentance being for the Jews only at a certain period of time only, I’d rather take Scripture at Its Word:

“I have had one message for Jews and Greeks alike—the necessity of repenting from sin and turning to God, and of having faith in our Lord Jesus.” Acts 20.21

Here is an observation from a man I greatly respect:

It is important for us to see the close connection between repentance and forgiveness, because while no amount of repentance can ever merit forgiveness in the sight of God, without repentance no soul will ever be saved.  Repentance is the telltale mark of the grace of God at work in our lives. Saving faith and true repentance are always found together. Saved souls are repentant souls.
Kent Hughes
Luke Commentary, p. 109.